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  • Writer's pictureTash Khan

Brake Pads: When do I Replace Them?

As a general rule, you should get your brake pads replaced every 10,000 to 20,000 miles to keep wear to a minimum. When it comes to your rotors, you have a bit longer. Your rotors should be replaced between 50,000 and 70,000 miles to keep your brakes in peak health.


When you hit these milestones, you should bring it in to our service center and we’ll check them for wear and damage.




Signs Your Brake Pads and Rotors Need to Be Replaced

If you don’t know the exact mileage of your car, you should look for signs that you need a brake pad or rotor replacement. Some signs to be aware of are:

  • Intermittent Screeching: This might be one of the easiest signs to notice. If you hear a high-pitched screeching when you’re slowing down, it could be a sign that you might need a brake pad replacement.

  • Vibrating Steering Wheel: If you feel a slight rumble in your steering wheel when you’re slowing down, it could mean that your brake pads are worn, and your rotors are being exposed to excessive heat.

  • Grinding Noises: If your vehicle has stopped its screeching and moved onto a grumpy grumbling sound when you brake, it could mean that your pads have completely worn through and you should bring it into our service center for a replacement as soon as possible.

If you’ve noticed any of these signs, you should get your car into our service center for your car’s health.


Why You Should Replace Your Brake Pads and Rotors Regularly

You may be wondering why you even need to replace your brake pads and rotors. It’s important to note that your car is very much like a living body, with everything working together to give you a smooth and reliable ride. If one part starts to get worn, then it can cause issues elsewhere.


For example, if your car is having trouble braking or is pulling to the side when you brake, then replacing your brake pads and rotors can eliminate these issues.


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